ARTISTS

TALKDEMONIC



MEMBERS
Kevin O'Connor - drums, synths, pianos, programming beats, bass, accordion, banjo, guitar, rhodes, wurlitzer, etc.
Lisa Molinaro - viola, cello.

BIO
Speakers everywhere this fall will rejoice with the arrival of Eyes at Half Mast, the third record from Talkdemonic. The Portland, Oregon duo of Kevin O'Connor and Lisa Molinaro have been playing together since 2003; she plays the viola and cello, while he plays everything else, including, but not limited to: drums, synths, and acoustic instruments. The result is an intoxicating blend of symphonic strings and explosive percussion; achingly beautiful music.

Eyes at Half Mast is the band's high water mark. The album teems with moments of spirited beauty, (especially on Duality of Deathening and March Movement) and of haunting elegies (as exemplified by Tides in Their Grave and Dust and Heat). There are passages filled with raw dissonance on the record, such as the release and tension offered by Civilian. There is a sense of loss and memory running through many of these songs, but the tone of the record is ultimately one of hope, a satisfyingly dark vitality that embraces melodic confidence.

Talkdemonic continue to expand the range of emotion that they are able to evoke without words. The band is emerging in terms of composition, song structure and recording, and the sound crystallizes here. Talkdemonic hit a stride in songwriting with tunes like Ending the Orange Glow and Black Wood Crimson, which feature complex arrangements, layers and harmonies. It's worth nor mixed thirteen of the fourteen songs from this set.
Audiences admire Talkdemonic for their uncompromisingly cathartic and bewitching live sets, as they witness the co-mingling of O'Connor's rhythmic prowess and Molinaro's tempestuous craft. It becomes a welcome contagion, to know Talkdemonic, as they remind us continue to treat music as something of crucial importance and endless amazement.

PRESS
URB MAGAZINE REVIEW:
"Talkdemonic doesn't speak in tongues; in fact the instrumental duo doesn't speak at all. And yet these wistful vignettes of viola + Powerbook + percussion speak volumes. It's like the collected folklore of when the Dirty Three, the Notwist and M83 huddled under an umbrella, linking samplers." -Tony Ware, Urb

SKYSCRAPER REVIEW:
"Kevin O'Connor and Lisa Molinaro, the duo behind instrumental outfit Talkdemonic, call their music "folktronic hop," a description as cute as it is accurate. Still, it doesn't give away all the secrets behind their complex layered sound. Talkdemonic began as a solo project for the Portland, Oregon based O'Connor, who released the overlooked and undr the radar Mutiny Sunshine in 2004. Beat Romantic is a remarkable step forward in many respects- highlighted by the permanent addition of Molinaro on viola and synth- which builds on an already sonically drenched palette of guitar, drums, keyboards and electronics. The album is certainly folk-based, in many respects: acoustic guitar can be heard weaving throughout "Mountaintops in Caves" and "Sept with Smith," while banjo adorns the jaunty "Dusty Fluorescent/Wooden Shelves." Arguably the most compelling elements of Talkdemonic lie with O'Connor's precise and forceful work on the drum kit and Molinaro on the viola- which seems to sweep each song along, connecting the dots between each electronic and organic element. With post-rock currently at a new fever pitch, it would appear challenging for a band like Talkdemonic to break through the clutter, but with Beat Romantic, they have done just that, breathing some much needed linfe into the often undistinguishable world of instrumental rock." -Andy Hurst, Skyscraper

TALKDEMONIC Beat Romantic PITCHFORK REVIEW 7.8
"On the cover of Beat Romantic, the sophomore release from Portland, Ore.'s Talkdemonic, we see a path strewn with branches and grasses winding toward the horizon through a thick stand of birches. It's a gorgeously idyllic scene: the trees' slender white trunks, the canopy of green. But there's something decidedly unnatural about the image. The hall-of-mirrors symmetry smacks of digital manipulation, of a version of nature enhanced by technology.

The same can be said of Talkdemonic's instrumental post-rock, which lays a bevy of acoustic elements over a foundation of pulsing programmed beats and modulating, soft-focus synthesizers. The duo acquiesces to this tension, cheekily dubbing their music "folktronic hop," a hybrid genre that seems to have its roots in records like Bjork's Homogenic. But, without a doubt, it's the players, not the preset laptop tracks, who lend Talkdemonic's music its emotional heft. Kevin O'Connor plays banjo, guitar, piano, and Wurlitzer on the recording, but it's his highly expressive drumming that is most memorable. When the punctuated rhythm of programmed percussion gives way to cascading cymbal crashes and spacious break beats, it's nothing short of cathartic. And viola-player Lisa Molinaro's performances ooze with feeling, as beautiful swells of strings render the need for vocals understandably dispensable.

The songs on Beat Romantic are dense sonic architectures, adding layer upon layer of melody and counter-melody as they grow. On album opener "Veraison", a truncated viola loop repeats for the song's duration, as Molinaro blankets it in a palimpsest of overdubs, her legato bowing countering the clipped repetition of the sample. "Dusty Flourescent/Wooden Shelves" begins with a misleading sense of restraint, all plucked banjo strings and roomy snare strikes. But 15 seconds in, O'Connor absolutely thrashes his kit as a descending bass line and ascending synth riff expand the background. Beat Romantic's highlight, though, is the one-two punch of "Bering" and "Human Till Born". Teeming with soaring harmonies, "Bering" features Molinaro's most affecting playing. As she abusively rakes the strings of her viola at the end of the song, the track segues into a feast of pummeling drums that would make DJ Shadow proud.


While Talkdemonic's streamlined compositions avoid the trappings of more self-indulgent instrumental acts, at times, they could use a little more room to breathe. Many songs don't make it past two minutes, which results in the album unfolding like a single piece of nearly continuous music. Such unity is a credit to their sense of vision, even if it suppresses some of their best melodies in a kind of sameness. But, also like the cover's birch grove, Beat Romantic's allure isn't in isolated beauty, but the juxtaposition of so much of it."
-John Motley, Pitchfork

SHOWS

9/25 Missoula , Montana @ Badlander (KBGA Birthday Bash, 9pm $5 21+, $7 All Ages)
9/26 Garden City, Idaho @ Visual Arts Collective (3638 Osage Street, w/ Church and Finn Riggins)
9/27 Salt Lake City, Utah @ Kilby Court (All Ages!)
9/28 Denver, Colorado @ Hi Dive w/ Western Autos ($8 adv)

MEDIA










STORE


TALKDEMONIC
Mutiny Sunshine
LMD24B - VINYL
Released 2004

TALKDEMONIC
Mutiny Sunshine
LMD24A - CD
Released 2004

CATALOG

TALKDEMONIC- mutiny sunshine
BLUE VINYL - 2004
LMD24B

TRACK LISTINGS:

*01* i am the son and the heiress
*02* dec27
*03* final russian
*04* in the machinery of night
*05* indian angel
*06* blood dripped from yr eyes
*07* mutiny sunshine
*08* versus the above
*09* starry dynamo
*10* andean twilight
*11* the last untouched
*12* eardrum symphony
*13* when i spent october with erik
*14* the snow melted, it was goodnight


TALKDEMONIC- mutiny sunshine
CD - 2004
LMD24A

TRACK LISTINGS: CD

*01* i am the son and the heiress
*02* dec27
*03* final russian
*04* in the machinery of night
*05* indian angel
*06* blood dripped from yr eyes
*07* mutiny sunshine
*08* versus the above
*09* starry dynamo
*10* andean twilight
*11* the last untouched
*12* eardrum symphony
*13* when i spent october with erik
*14* the snow melted, it was goodnight



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